Central Square Florist

Central Square Florist

Posted by Jackie Levine on February 2, 2020 | Last Updated: February 12, 2020 Flowers Succulents

An Essential Guide to Growing Succulents

Succulents are affordable, easy to care for, and fun to collect. Plus, they’ve never been more on-trend than they are now! One of the most sought-after types of houseplant, succulents of all varieties will brighten up your indoor spaces. If you’re thinking about adding a few succulents to your home or office, take a look at this quick guide to caring for indoor succulents from Central Square Florist in Boston.

How Succulents Differ from Other plants

Most plants have papery leaves, but succulents have thick, rubbery leaves that help them store water. Succulent plants store water in their leaves, roots, and stems, which is why they’re called succulents. (Succulent means moist.) Since they’re experts at holding water, they grow all over the world in places where water is hard to come by. They can be found in arid regions like deserts and humid rainforests, where they grow from the bark of trees.

Various Succulent Plants

Various Succulent Plants

Why It’s Great to Grow Succulents Inside

Succulents are a great choice for growing inside because they’ll do a lot to improve your indoor environment. Firstly, succulents help regulate humidity in the air, releasing moisture when it’s dry and sucking up moisture when it’s humid. They also help to purify the air. Succulent roots gently pump air toward the soil. As toxins like VOCs reach their roots, the plants convert harmful chemicals into nutrients, effectively eradicating indoor air pollution. Succulents also emit oxygen, replenishing indoor air.

Popular Succulent Varieties

Since succulents grow all around the world, there is an endless number of varieties that can be grown alone or arranged together in a succulent garden. Some of the most popular include the following:

Echeveria

Echeveria are commonly included in succulent gardens. They grow into starburst-shaped plants with a variety of different leaves and colors. Some echeveria grow in shades of green, while others are pink, red, or black. Their leaves can range in shape from stick-like to tubular, flat to crinkled, and pointed to round.

Echeveria

Echeveria

Senecio Rowleyanus (String of Pearls)

These unusual succulents look exactly like their name indicates — just like a string of pearls. They have long, dangling vines spotted sporadically with green spheres that resemble pearls. It’s hard to believe this succulent is an actual plant that grows on Earth. These look best in a hanging planter or a pot on a pedestal.

String of Pearls

String of Pearls

Crassula Ovata (Gollum or Finger Jade)

Gollum or finger jade is a type of crassula succulent that grows tubular leaves on top of stems, resembling odd-looking, miniature trees. Given enough growing time, the trunks of these succulents will eventually become rigid and brown, making them look even more like a little forest.

Succulent - Crassula

Succulent – Crassula

How to Grow Healthy Indoor Succulents

The hardest part about caring for succulents is trying not to love them too much. Rarely needing to be pruned or watered, succulents basically thrive on neglect. To help your indoor succulents thrive, plant them in a pot that drains easily with soil formulated for cacti and succulents. Give them a warm, sunny perch and water sparingly. During the winter, succulents probably won’t need to be watered more than once a month. In the summer, succulents can be watered more frequently, about once every week or two. Make sure the soil has dried completely before watering and never let a succulent sit in standing water.

Various Succulents

Various Succulents

If a succulent’s leaves turn yellow or brown, this is a sign of distress. This usually occurs due to over-watering, but it can also indicate a thirsty plant. Check the soil to see if it’s wet or dry and contact an expert at Central Square Florist for additional help.